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Get THE Look: Stella’s Closet

FUJIFILM x The Home Edit

As you may know, the phrase “like mother, like daughter” runs deep in my family. Which is why I wasn’t surprised when I walked in on my daughter, Stella, color-coordinating her pencils in ROYGBIV. It’s only a matter of time before she locks herself in her bathroom with a glass of juice to get away from us.

All jokes aside, it’s clear to us that Stella is an extremely visual person like I am. But I never realized how visual until she started wanting to pick out her own clothes in the morning. Let’s just say she’s already telling me she has “nothing to wear” and she’s not even in middle school yet. Not because I don’t properly clothe her or my house guests go without clean laundry—she’s just another girl with a closet of clothes…with nothing to wear.

The result? She’d end up tearing through her closet and leaving a pile of clothes on the floor. It didn’t matter that her closet was neatly organized by categories and labeled bins, it just wasn’t working for her. I needed to create a system that allows her to see the clothes she has more easily, in a way that made sense for her.

Inspired by Cher Horowitz in the iconic 1995 film, Clueless, I decided that if bins and categories weren’t enough, I’d create some sort of visual outfit database, but with images taken from my iPhone. (If you think this sounds excessive, remember: I work smarter—not harder. Keep reading.) To prove to Stella that she did, in fact, own a closet full of clothes, we spent the day picking out her favorite outfits and creating a donate pile of what she outgrew. From there, we snapped pictures of her preferred “looks” and all of her shoes. (It’s basically playing dress-up in 2019, y’all.)

Since we needed the photos ASAP, I didn’t waste any time getting them developed or printed elsewhere. Introducing my FUJIFILM instax SHARE® SP-3 SQ printer.

Once you wirelessly connect to the printer’s WiFi, it can print any photo that’s on my smartphone on instax SQUARE® film, including any from Instagram, Dropbox, Google Photos, etc., by uploading it on the instax SHARE app (available for free on Apple’s app store or Google Play). I’m also able to edit the photos on the app before I print them—whether that means playing with the color filters, adding text, or creating a collage.

 Then I attached each shoe photo to it’s matching container. We put the shoes she wears the most on the middle shelf so she can access them easier.

While I was managed the shoes, Stella handled the outfits by grouping them together and snapping photos on our other FUJIFILM favorite, the instax SQUARE® SQ6 instant print camera (her dad is a professional photographer so maybe “like father, like daughter” applies here, too?). She loves this camera because it’s easy to use, has three strobe color filters you can attach to the flash, and prints instantly. I should also mention that the camera itself comes in five metallic colors…always a plus.

Once Stella was done with her photo shoot, we used the closet door to create image grid and grouped the outfits accordingly on the rack.

It’s really that easy. To create this closet look for your kids (or even yourself!) I definitely suggest using the FUJIFILM instax SQ6 and SP-3 printer. It saves time and adds a unique aesthetic to the space.

Since we created this new system, Stella actually looks forward to getting herself dressed in the morning and there’s also no longer a pile of clothes on the floor. What more can I ask for? It’s a classic organizing secret: If something makes your life easier and you like the way it looks, you’ll be less likely to mess it up.

Xo, Clea


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  1. Did you guys decide where you’re expanding to officially? I’m somehow missing it on your feed? Any chance for homeedit Midwest…like Kansas? Such a huge fan and trying to get an organizing business up and running, but would rather be employed by the masters themselves.

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